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Debut novel by Bill Clinton: Who sits in the White House

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At the end, the President stands in front of the members of the Congress in Washington and gives a speech full of pathos, which should probably be considered a warning legacy. After all that has happened, US President Jonathan Duncan wants a fresh start across party lines to protect American democracy from further slipping into clan structures, extremism and growing prejudice. “Our willingness to expect the worst from the others is increasing. Our ability to solve problems and seize opportunities is diminishing. We need to get better. “A short all-clear to all Trump-tired at the beginning: The incumbent US President does not appear in the political thriller” The President is Missing “of his predecessor Bill Clinton and his co-author James Patterson. At least not by name. He haunts just as a deterrent version of the most powerful man in the world in the background of this thriller.

Clinton changes from autobiography to fiction

Interesting what US presidents do after their term of office: George W. Bush paints, Barack Obama has just signed with his wife Michelle on Netflix as a producer. And Bill Clinton has after the electoral defeat of his wife Hillary and found next to the obligations in his foundation apparently pleased with the book writing: The successful autobiographer dares now for the first time in fiction – in Donald Trump some observers already feel like in a bad movie. The plot of the recently published, more classic 480-page thriller is quickly told: President Duncan, who has just defend himself in front of a committee of inquiry because of a failed operation in Algeria against imminent impeachment, suddenly disappears from the public, with the help of a few Confident, purified hackers as well as the heads of government of Russia, Israel and Germany fend off a gigantic cyberattack. (For political gourmets on the sidelines: The Chancellor’s name is Richter, the head of the Federal Intelligence Service Kohl) The widowed war hero from North Carolina, once trapped in Iraq and despite torture stood firm driving himself car, shoots accurately and gives the born leader: justice-loving, empathetic and determined, if need be, tough too.

A terrorist wants to catapult America into the Middle Ages

Serial fans are reminded of “The Designated Survivor,” in which Kiefer Sutherland, as morally solid US President Tom Kirkman, faces similar challenges to save his country from multiple catastrophes. The film rights of “The President is Missing”, which already reads like a finished screenplay over long stretches, have naturally long been sold: to the cable channel Showtime.

The Turkish terrorist and leader of the group “Sons of Jihad” Suliman Cindoruk – complicated not a Muslim, but a “secular right-wing nationalist who is fighting against the influence of the West in Southern and Eastern Europe”, as Duncan explains – wants by means of a cyber attack to catapult the United States back to the technological Middle Ages. And, as it turns out, that would not only suit some members of the Saudi royal family, but Russia, still dreaming of old age, well. More is not revealed at this point.

Duncan wants to prevent “Dark Ages”, the codename of the cyberattack, at the last minute and is followed in these three crucial days in May by a pregnant, as a child in the Balkans severely traumatized assassin, who calls himself Bach, likes to listen to classical music and with her precision rifle “Anna Magdalena” their victims cold-bloodedly turns off.

Flattering image cultivation for the ex-president

It must be a belated satisfaction for 71-year-old Bill Clinton to create this presidential action hero who, threatened with betrayals from within his own ranks, may demand no less than the moral rebuilding of America at the end of Congress: including equitable voting rights. and tax reform, a liberal immigration law and affordable medical care.

For example, in his own term in office between 1993 and 2001, Clinton did not succeed in stopping the later 9/11 mastermind Osama bin Laden, and in the Monica Lewinsky affair he even fought an impeachment . Since then, Clinton has also lost his reputation as the “best US president” on the democratic basis . When he was interviewed earlier this week as part of his promotional tour on NBC in connection with the Lewinsky affair with the MeToo movement, he responded angrily. It was followed by a shitstorm, CNN called Clinton’s behavior “unreasonable”.

“The President is Missing” serves the image correction to a certain extent. Memories of another president are shimmering when Clinton lets Duncan say, “What if we were to ask ourselves: Who can I help today instead of thinking about who I can harm today?” The avowed fan of Forbes, after all America’s “richest author” James Patterson (with a circulation of 365 million) briefly sets out from a democratic point of view an ideal government program that Clinton himself was never able to implement. Again and again, Duncan storms against the political strippers, who act only for power strategic calculations, while the president wants to do only the right thing to improve the world. The question remains, is this really the image Bill Clinton has of himself in retrospect?